Timeline

 

Lenape Delaware Native People

12,000 BC - 1700 AD

Evidence of the native people is extensive on the peninsula now known as the Town of Esopus. Our collection documents settlement from the pre-Colonial to the Contact Period.

20181019_100844.jpg
halfmoon.jpg

Arrival of the Dutch

1609

The arrival of the explorer Henry Hudson, an Englishman under the employ of the Dutch, in 1609 marked the beginning of continuous settlement of the area that became known as the Hudson River Valley. The Dutch ruled until 1664. Dutch continued to be spoken in the colony for at least the next 50 years. Today, many descendants of the early settlers remain.

Early Settlement

1664 - 1777

Beginning in 1664, control of the Dutch Province of Nieuw Netherland moved to English rule.  The area now known as the Town of Esopus, then considered Klyne or "little" Esopus extended from what is now the Rondout Creek to Black Creek and the Wallkill River to the Hudson River. Image: The Peter Van Aken Farm, from the Collection of Klyne Esopus Museum

VanAkenHomestead363.jpg
20181019_101504.jpg

Slavery in the Town of Esopus

1625 - 1827

Slavery existed in New York from the time the Dutch settled the region.  The contribution of the people brought here due to the "peculiar institution" cannot be overstated as their labor built the northern economy.  In the area now known as the Town of Esopus, relatively few people held enslaved people. The lasting effects of the Institution of Slavery remain. More research will need to be done on the Institution of Slavery and its lasting effects in the Town of Esopus.

 Image: Exhibit Case, Klyne Esopus Museum

Sojourner Truth

1797 - 1883

Sojourner Truth born Isabella (Belle) Baumfree; c. 1797 into slavery on the Johannis Hardenberg farm in Swartekill, Esopus, Ulster County, New York.  She escaped with her infant daughter travelling miles on foot to freedom in 1826. After going to court to recover her son who had been captured and sold back into slavery in the south, in 1828 she became the first black woman to win such a case against a white man.

She gave herself the name Sojourner Truth in 1843 after she became convinced that God had called her to leave the city and go into the countryside "testifying the hope that was in her".[1] Her best-known speech was delivered extemporaneously, in 1851, at the Ohio Women's Rights Convention in Akron, Ohio. The speech became widely known during the Civil War by the title "Ain't I a Woman?," a variation of the original speech re-written by someone else using a stereotypical Southern dialect; whereas Sojourner Truth was from New York and grew up speaking Dutch as her first language. During the Civil War, Truth helped recruit black troops for the Union Army; after the war, she tried unsuccessfully to secure land grants from the federal government for former slaves.  She died on November 26, 1883). She was an African-American abolitionist and women's rights activist. 

Sojourner Truth.jpg
Stone-House-River-Road-and-Broadway-300x195.jpg

American Revolution

1775 - 1784

During the era of the American Revolution:

  • Esopus wheat provisioned the Continental Army. Remains of the mill still exist.

  • British troops spent the night before the Burning of Kingston - anchored off Esopus Island - in a colonial tavern probably at Esopus Landing

  • Prison ships holding British troops & loyalists could be seen anchored in the Rondout Creek

Town of Esopus Incorporated

1811

Early town meetings are held at Ellsworth's Tavern (demolished).

Ellsworth's Store site.jpg
Wolf

Early Laws Established

1812

The town offered a bounty of $12.50 for each wolf killed within the town and required the head and ears as proof and an oath.

British Invasion

1812

About 20 men from Esopus enlisted in the War of 1812:
Abraham Degraff, John Deyo, Tobias DuBois, Isaac Houghtaling, Samuel Ostrander, Stephen Terwilliger, John B. Van Aken, Thomas Wells, William Wise, Henry Ellsworth, Henry Degraff, Purdy Dickinson, Theophilus Ellsworth, Henry Freer, Samuel Lefevre, John L Plough, Mahlon Thorp, Charles B Van Wagner, John Winfield Jr

Flag of United Kingdom
School #13 revised.jpg

Public School Districts Created

1814

Esopus establishes a system of public school districts.

School #13, pictured here, stood where the Dollar General & Laundromat currently stand.  A Grand Union grocery store and later an IGA grocery occupied the same location. 

Reformed Dutch Church of
Klyne Esopus

1791 - 1965

The first congregation to form in the Town of Esopus began in 1791 in a church located 1000 feet to the north of the current building. The brick church that stands on the hill was built in 1827. It closed in 1965 and re-opened as the Town Historical Society Museum in 1986.  In 2002, the building was listed on the NYS and National Registers of Historic Places.

Low Dutch Church of Klyne Esopus.jpg
Museum 3

Teen Studio

February 11, 2025

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Timeline

Lenape Delaware Native People

12,000 BC - 1700 AD

Evidence of the native people is extensive on the peninsula now known as the Town of Esopus. Our collection documents settlement from the pre-Colonial to the Contact Period.

20181019_100844.jpg
halfmoon.jpg

Arrival of the Dutch

1609

The arrival of the explorer Henry Hudson, an Englishman under the employ of the Dutch, in 1609 marked the beginning of continuous settlement of the area that became known as the Hudson River Valley. The Dutch ruled until 1664. Dutch continued to be spoken in the colony for at least the next 50 years. Today, many descendants of the early settlers remain.

Early Settlement

1664 - 1777

Beginning in 1664, control of the Dutch Province of Nieuw Netherland moved to English rule.  The area now known as the Town of Esopus, then considered Klyne or "little" Esopus extended from what is now the Rondout Creek to Black Creek and the Wallkill River to the Hudson River. Image: The Peter Van Aken Farm, from the Collection of Klyne Esopus Museum

VanAkenHomestead363.jpg
20181019_101504.jpg

Slavery in the Town of Esopus

1625 - 1827

Slavery existed in New York from the time the Dutch settled the region.  The contribution of the people brought here due to the "peculiar institution" cannot be overstated as their labor built the northern economy.  In the area now known as the Town of Esopus, relatively few people held enslaved people. The lasting effects of the Institution of Slavery remain. More research will need to be done on the Institution of Slavery and its lasting effects in the Town of Esopus.

 Image: Exhibit Case, Klyne Esopus Museum

Sojourner Truth

1797 - 1883

Sojourner Truth born Isabella (Belle) Baumfree; c. 1797 into slavery on the Johannis Hardenberg farm in Swartekill, Esopus, Ulster County, New York.  She escaped with her infant daughter travelling miles on foot to freedom in 1826. After going to court to recover her son who had been captured and sold back into slavery in the south, in 1828 she became the first black woman to win such a case against a white man.

She gave herself the name Sojourner Truth in 1843 after she became convinced that God had called her to leave the city and go into the countryside "testifying the hope that was in her".[1] Her best-known speech was delivered extemporaneously, in 1851, at the Ohio Women's Rights Convention in Akron, Ohio. The speech became widely known during the Civil War by the title "Ain't I a Woman?," a variation of the original speech re-written by someone else using a stereotypical Southern dialect; whereas Sojourner Truth was from New York and grew up speaking Dutch as her first language. During the Civil War, Truth helped recruit black troops for the Union Army; after the war, she tried unsuccessfully to secure land grants from the federal government for former slaves.  She died on November 26, 1883). She was an African-American abolitionist and women's rights activist. 

Sojourner Truth.jpg
Stone-House-River-Road-and-Broadway-300x195.jpg

American Revolution

1775 - 1784

During the era of the American Revolution:

  • Esopus wheat provisioned the Continental Army. Remains of the mill still exist.

  • British troops spent the night before the Burning of Kingston - anchored off Esopus Island - in a colonial tavern probably at Esopus Landing

  • Prison ships holding British troops & loyalists could be seen anchored in the Rondout Creek

Town of Esopus Incorporated

1811

Early town meetings are held at Ellsworth's Tavern (demolished).

Ellsworth's Store site.jpg
Wolf

Early Laws Established

1812

The town offered a bounty of $12.50 for each wolf killed within the town and required the head and ears as proof and an oath.

British Invasion

1812

About 20 men from Esopus enlisted in the War of 1812:
Abraham Degraff, John Deyo, Tobias DuBois, Isaac Houghtaling, Samuel Ostrander, Stephen Terwilliger, John B. Van Aken, Thomas Wells, William Wise, Henry Ellsworth, Henry Degraff, Purdy Dickinson, Theophilus Ellsworth, Henry Freer, Samuel Lefevre, John L Plough, Mahlon Thorp, Charles B Van Wagner, John Winfield Jr

Flag of United Kingdom
School #13 revised.jpg

Public School Districts Created

1814

Esopus establishes a system of public school districts.

School #13, pictured here, stood where the Dollar General & Laundromat currently stand.  A Grand Union grocery store and later an IGA grocery occupied the same location. 

Reformed Dutch Church of
Klyne Esopus

1791 - 1965

The first congregation to form in the Town of Esopus began in 1791 in a church located 1000 feet to the north of the current building. The brick church that stands on the hill was built in 1827. It closed in 1965 and re-opened as the Town Historical Society Museum in 1986.  In 2002, the building was listed on the NYS and National Registers of Historic Places.

Low Dutch Church of Klyne Esopus.jpg
 

(845) 338-8109

764 US-9W, Ulster Park, NY 12487, USA

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